Posts Tagged ‘substance abuse’

Alcohol Awareness Month – April

Friday, April 1st, 2022

 

Founded and sponsored by NCADD, Alcohol Awareness Month was established in 1987 to help reduce the stigma so often associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease, genetically predisposed and fatal if untreated. However people can and do recover. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20 million individuals and family members are living lives in recovery!

Alcohol Awareness Month – April

Thursday, April 1st, 2021

 

Founded and sponsored by NCADD, Alcohol Awareness Month was established in 1987 to help reduce the stigma so often associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease, genetically predisposed and fatal if untreated. However people can and do recover. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20 million individuals and family members are living lives in recovery!

Alcohol Awareness Month – April

Wednesday, April 1st, 2020

 

Founded and sponsored by NCADD, Alcohol Awareness Month was established in 1987 to help reduce the stigma so often associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease, genetically predisposed and fatal if untreated. However people can and do recover. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20 million individuals and family members are living lives in recovery!

Alcohol Awareness Month – April

Monday, April 1st, 2019

 

Founded and sponsored by NCADD, Alcohol Awareness Month was established in 1987 to help reduce the stigma so often associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease, genetically predisposed and fatal if untreated. However people can and do recover. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20 million individuals and family members are living lives in recovery!

New Sullivan Co Helpline Ad Features HVCS Employee Frank Barone

Monday, May 21st, 2018

Frank BaroneFrank Barone, HVCS’ Syringe Exchange Program Prevention Specialist, recently recorded a public service ad for the Sullivan County Helpline. In less than a minute, you’ll get a sense of Frank’s past and why he’s so passionate about his work here at HVCS.

Frank has been a panelist and speaker at several recent conferences and town halls about the opioid epidemic, with more speaking engagements to come.

Thanks to the Sullivan County Health Department for sharing this with us, and for partnering with HVCS to reach more people with addiction disorders in Sullivan County.

Narcan-Resistant Fentanyl Making Its Way Closer to Hudson Valley

Tuesday, March 6th, 2018

This is a bit of old news, but it’s being circulated again in the substance abuse treatment field to make sure users are fully aware of the risks, and so that Narcan carriers know that they may be up against a powerful new drug.

According to Narconon Suncoast:

In Pittsburgh, PA a type of Narcan-resistant Fentanyl has been found in batches of heroin and it’s already causing numerous overdoses and deaths. Apparently, it’s hundreds of times more powerful than morphine and called Acryl-Fentanyl.”

“Acryl-Fentanyl is synthesized, which means it’s artificially created and has no natural origin (remember, heroin’s natural origin is a poppy plant). Not only is it manmade, but it’s being created in China, like most other research chemicals and synthetic drugs and being smuggled into the United States.

DEA Special Agent In-Charge, David Battiste said, “If Acryl-fentanyl is introduced into the population, it can have devastating effects. You would have to reuse Narcan if you are revived from Narcan at all.”

That’s right folks, this stuff is completely resistant to Narcan. Like Special Agent Battiste said, it’s unlikely that Narcan will reverse its effects and, if it does, it will take multiple, multiple doses. We’re already having enough of a problem with the strength of opiates these days. Narcan is struggling to keep up and continue to save the lives of those who overdose. Acryl-Fentanyl is going to make this problem a whole lot worse and this is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the devastating effects this drug is going to have on our society.”

Read the full article here.

 

Buprenorphine Eligibility Waiver Training for Clinical Providers

Saturday, December 2nd, 2017

The NYSDOH AIDS Institute and Sullivan County Public Health Services are hosting a Free Buprenorphine Eligibility Waiver Training for Clinical Providers (Physicians, Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants, Pharmacists, and Medical Residents) on Saturday, December 2nd, 2017 from 8:00AM to 1:00PM at Catskills Regional Medical Center, 68 Harris-Bushville Rd, Board Room, Harris, NY 12742.

As you may know, Sullivan County has some of the highest rates of opioid overdose in New York State. In just the first seven months of 2017, Sullivan County has experienced a reported 20 overdose deaths. From 2013-2016, there were approximately 75 reported opioid overdose deaths. We know these numbers are higher, and continue to increase due to access to fentanyl. We are seeking to increase the volume of providers in and around your county that are able to offer medication assisted treatment (MAT) to people using opioids whom could benefit from buprenorphine (or “suboxone”).

Attached is a flyer with further information, including location, online registration, and more details. Further information will be sent out to confirmed attendees. Light refreshments will be provided. Registration closes on November 29th at 5pm.

Trainers:
Sharon Stancliff, MD, Harm Reduction Coalition, New York, NY
Bruce Trigg, MD, Harm Reduction Coalition, New York, NY

Please Note: CME Credits will be made available. This is the first half of the minimum required 8 hours of training, and the second half must be completed online after attendance to the live training. Currently NPs & PAs are required to take an additional 16 hours of online training which is available on the PCSS-MAT website (Part 2).

For more information about buprenorphine related trainings, mentoring, coaching, technical assistance and more, please contact us at buprenorphine@health.ny.gov or 1-800-692-8528.

NYS Becomes 1st in Nation to Offer Low- or No-Cost Naloxone

Wednesday, August 9th, 2017

From a press release issued by Gov. Cuomo on Monday, August 7, 2017

GOVERNOR CUOMO ANNOUNCES NO-COST OR LOWER-COST NALOXONE AVAILABLE AT PHARMACIES ACROSS NEW YORK

First-in-the-Nation Program Offers Co-Payment Assistance For Medicine to Reverse Opioid Overdoses Beginning August 9, 2017

Expands State’s Aggressive Efforts to Fight the Opioid Epidemic

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced a first-in-the-nation program to provide no-cost or lower-cost naloxone at pharmacies across New York. Beginning August 9, 2017, individuals with prescription health insurance coverage, including Medicaid and Medicare, will receive up to $40 in co-payment assistance, resulting in reduced cost or no cost for this lifesaving medicine. Uninsured individuals and individuals without prescription coverage will still be able to receive naloxone at no cost through New York’s network of registered opioid overdose prevention programs.

“This first-in-the-nation program will help put this lifesaving treatment in more hands and is one more prong in this administration’s efforts to battle heroin and opioid abuse,” Governor Cuomo said. “This is one more step toward a stronger, healthier New York for all.”

Naloxone is a medicine used to reverse opioid overdoses. Reducing the cost of this lifesaving medication builds on Governor Cuomo’s previous action to make naloxone available in pharmacies without a prescription which began in January 2016. Previously, New Yorkers could only receive naloxone with a prescription or through a registered opioid overdose prevention program.

As of August 9, 2017, New Yorkers can find co-payment information at pharmacy counters across the state and at: www.health.ny.gov/overdose. Individuals should provide this information to the pharmacist when asking for naloxone in order to receive it with no or lower out-of-pocket expense. The Naloxone Co-payment Assistance Program is funded by New York State’s Opioid Overdose Prevention Program.

Additionally, through New York’s network of registered opioid overdose prevention programs, uninsured individuals and individuals without prescription coverage will be able to receive naloxone at no cost. A full list of these programs is available here.

In the 2017 State Budget, Governor Cuomo invested over $200 million to fight the heroin and opioid epidemic. This unprecedented support is directed at prevention, treatment and recovery programs that address chemical dependency, expand residential service opportunities and promote public awareness and education.

Naloxone Saves Lives

Naloxone is a prescription medication used to reverse the effects of overdoses caused by heroin, prescription pain medication and other opioids. In 2014, state agencies began working together to develop a statewide program to train law enforcement personnel on how to administer naloxone. Since the trainings began, over 10,000 officers have been trained to administer the drug and 3,091 officers have been certified to train other officers.

Trained law enforcement officers across New York are saving lives with the naloxone they carry. Since April of 2014, 2,036 officers have administered naloxone to over 3,100 individuals, saving the lives of nearly 90 percent of the individuals that required assistance.

View a fact sheet on law enforcement naloxone training and usage, here.

New York State Department of Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said, “Naloxone is very effective at reversing opioid overdoses. Under Governor Cuomo’s leadership, New York State has taken comprehensive actions to stem the tide of opioid abuse, from increasing the number of treatment beds to making important health insurance reforms to eliminate barriers to accessing substance use services. The new copayment assistance program will make naloxone more available in communities across New York and save lives.”

New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services Commissioner Arlene González-Sánchez said, “By guaranteeing affordable Naloxone to all New Yorkers, we will save thousands of lives and help repair the damage done to our communities by the opioid epidemic. Saving lives is the ultimate goal of all of our prevention, treatment, and recovery initiatives, and with this latest effort, Governor Cuomo is once again establishing New York State as a national leader in the field of addiction care.”

Chair of the Senate Committee on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse George Amedore said, “By increasing access to this effective remedy for drug overdoses, we are taking yet another step forward in combatting the heroin and opioid epidemic. I commend the Governor for removing barriers to help establish a stronger, healthier New York for generations.”

Chair of the Assembly Committee on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Linda B. Rosenthal said, “New York’s communities are hard-struck by the heroin and opioid epidemic, and we must turn the tide by preventing more overdose deaths. Governor Cuomo’s plan to expand access to lifesaving naloxone through a new low-cost or no-cost co-payment system will help those struggling with this disease. By increasing access to Naloxone and cutting costs related to this lifesaving medication, New Yorkers in every corner of the state will be better equipped to save lives and help people receive the treatment they need. I look forward to working closely with the Administration to continue expanding access to overdose prevention and greater treatment options.”

Chair of the Senate Health Committee Kemp Hannon said, “The health and well-being of residents is our top priority. I look forward to working with the Governor to bring this treatment to our most vulnerable men and women, so that communities will be empowered to save the lives of thousands.”

Harm Reduction Coalition Medical Director Dr. Sharon Stancliff said, “This program will dramatically increase access to naloxone for people we haven’t easily reached. These include patients being treated for pain, loved ones of people returning from drug treatment or incarceration and people at risk in rural areas. This is a crisis and New York’s copayment assistance program adds to the solution.”

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Alcohol Awareness Month – April

Saturday, April 1st, 2017

 

Founded and sponsored by NCADD, Alcohol Awareness Month was established in 1987 to help reduce the stigma so often associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease, genetically predisposed and fatal if untreated. However people can and do recover. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20 million individuals and family members are living lives in recovery!

Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues Among LGBT Populations

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

The Henry K. Kaiser Family Foundation recently released an intriguing issue brief on LGBT healthcare entitled “Health and Access to Care and Coverage for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Individuals in the U.S.” The report is chock-full of fascinating statistics from a variety of recent studies. Check out the full report for sources.

The issue brief explored access to mental health services and rates of substance abuse among the LGBT population in the United States.

  • 25% of LGBT people abuse alcohol, compared to 5-10% of the heterosexual population.
  • MSM (men who have sex with men) are 12 times more likely to use amphetamines.
  • MSM are 10 times more likely to use heroin.
  • 41% of transgender people have attempted suicide.