Posts Tagged ‘stigma’

Alcohol Awareness Month – April

Friday, April 1st, 2022

 

Founded and sponsored by NCADD, Alcohol Awareness Month was established in 1987 to help reduce the stigma so often associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease, genetically predisposed and fatal if untreated. However people can and do recover. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20 million individuals and family members are living lives in recovery!

Alcohol Awareness Month – April

Thursday, April 1st, 2021

 

Founded and sponsored by NCADD, Alcohol Awareness Month was established in 1987 to help reduce the stigma so often associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease, genetically predisposed and fatal if untreated. However people can and do recover. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20 million individuals and family members are living lives in recovery!

Alcohol Awareness Month – April

Wednesday, April 1st, 2020

 

Founded and sponsored by NCADD, Alcohol Awareness Month was established in 1987 to help reduce the stigma so often associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease, genetically predisposed and fatal if untreated. However people can and do recover. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20 million individuals and family members are living lives in recovery!

Alcohol Awareness Month – April

Monday, April 1st, 2019

 

Founded and sponsored by NCADD, Alcohol Awareness Month was established in 1987 to help reduce the stigma so often associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease, genetically predisposed and fatal if untreated. However people can and do recover. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20 million individuals and family members are living lives in recovery!

A Day With HIV: Social Media Anti-Stigma Campaign

Friday, September 21st, 2018

HeA Day With HIV Logolp us capture 24 hours in the lives of people affected by HIV

This Friday, Sept. 21, you can take part in A Day with HIV, an anti-stigma campaign organized by Positively Aware, the HIV treatment magazine.

A Day with HIV seeks to capture 24 hours in the lives of people affected by HIV and its stigma—that’s everyone, regardless of age, race, gender identity or health status. We know that through imagery and storytelling we can diminish isolation and stigma. Here’s how to participate:

1. Take a snapshot of your day this Friday. Post it on your social media using the hashtag, #adaywithhiv; include a caption giving the time and location of your photo, and what inspired you to take it.

2. Upload your photo entry at www.adaywithhiv.com or email it to photo@adaywithhiv.com—it’ll be added to the campaign’s online gallery and considered for publication in the November + December issue of Positively Aware. In addition, four high-resolution images will be selected for different versions of the cover.

Our campaign gives people the opportunity to share their stories through photography—whether as selfies or artistic images. We hope you will consider becoming a part of A Day with HIV. If you have any questions, please contact Rick Guasco at TPAN.

Alcohol Awareness Month – April

Saturday, April 1st, 2017

 

Founded and sponsored by NCADD, Alcohol Awareness Month was established in 1987 to help reduce the stigma so often associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease, genetically predisposed and fatal if untreated. However people can and do recover. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20 million individuals and family members are living lives in recovery!