Posts Tagged ‘Hepatitis C’

Hepatitis Testing Day

Friday, May 19th, 2023

Hepatitis Testing Day

May 19

The Action Plan for the Prevention, Care, and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis designates May 19 as Hepatitis Testing Day.

Hepatitis Testing Day falls during May’s observance of Hepatitis Awareness Month.

More Resources

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month

Monday, May 1st, 2023

Hepatitis Testing Day

Thursday, May 19th, 2022

Hepatitis Testing Day

May 19

The Action Plan for the Prevention, Care, and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis designates May 19 as Hepatitis Testing Day.

Hepatitis Testing Day falls during May’s observance of Hepatitis Awareness Month.

More Resources

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month

Sunday, May 1st, 2022

World Hepatitis Day

Wednesday, July 28th, 2021

The World Hepatitis Day on 28 July  is an opportunity to add momentum to all efforts to implement the WHO’s first global health sector strategy on viral hepatitis for 2016-2021 and help Member States achieve the final goal – to eliminate hepatitis.

Eliminate hepatitis

Activities and awareness around World Hepatitis Day are designed to:

  • Build and leverage political engagement following official endorsement of the Global Health Sector Strategy on viral hepatitis at the World Health Assembly 2016.
  • Showcase emerging national responses to hepatitis in heavy burden countries.
  • Encourage actions and engagement by individuals, partners and the public.
  • Highlight the need for a greater global response .

In support of the “Eliminate hepatitis” campaign, WHO will release new information on national responses in 28 countries with the heaviest burden.

11 countries which carry almost 50% of the global burden of chronic hepatitis:

Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Uganda, Viet Nam.

17 countries that also have high prevalence and together with the above, account for 70% of the global burden:

Cambodia, Cameroon, Colombia, Ethiopia, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Morocco, Nepal, Peru, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Thailand, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Zimbabwe.

Key messages for World Hepatitis Day

1. Viral hepatitis is a major global health problem and needs an urgent response.

There were approximately 325 million people living with chronic hepatitis at the end of 2015.

Globally, an estimated 257 million people were living with hepatitis B (HBV) infection, and 71 million people were living with hepatitis C (HCV) infection in 2015.

2. Very few of those infected accessed testing and treatment, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

By the end of 2015, only 9% of HBV-infected people and 20% of HCV-infected people had been tested and diagnosed. Of those diagnosed with HBV infection, 8% (or 1.7 million people) were on treatment, while 7% of those diagnosed with HCV infection (or 1.1 million people) had started treatment in 2015.

The global targets for 2030 are: 90% of people with HBV and HCV infections tested and 80% of eligible patients are reached with treatment.

3. Viral hepatitis caused 1.34 million deaths in 2015 – comparable with TB deaths and exceeding deaths from HIV. Hepatitis deaths are increasing.

4. New hepatitis infections continue to occur, mostly hepatitis C.

The number of children under five living with chronic HBV infection was reduced to 1.3% in 2015 (from 4.7% before vaccines were introduced).

Hepatitis B vaccine is preventing approximately 4.5 million infections per year in children.

However, 1.75 million adults were newly infected with HCV in 2015, largely due to injecting drug use and due to unsafe injections in health care settings in certain countries.

5. Achieving the 2030 elimination goal is not overly ambitious; reports from 28 high-burden countries give cause for optimism.

On World Hepatitis Day 2017, WHO is publishing 28 country profiles which show that, despite many challenges, the global effort to eliminate hepatitis is gaining ground. However, major obstacles still remain.

Related links

Hepatitis Testing Day

Wednesday, May 19th, 2021

Hepatitis Testing Day

May 19

The Action Plan for the Prevention, Care, and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis designates May 19 as Hepatitis Testing Day.

Hepatitis Testing Day falls during May’s observance of Hepatitis Awareness Month.

More Resources

Hepatitis 101 Video Premiere

Friday, May 14th, 2021

Hepatitis Video PremiereMay is National Hepatitis Awareness Month, and in honor of the occasion we’re premiering a new video all about hepatitis. This video (which is less than half an hour in length) covers the basics of hepatitis and the 3 viruses that can cause it. Our Hepatitis C Patient Navigator, Ryan Schoenau, provides easy to understand explanations of this silent epidemic. Tune in on Friday, May 14th at 12:30 pm on our Facebook page or YouTube channel. If you still have questions, or want to refer yourself or someone else for services, call Ryan at (845) 704-7752 or email rschoenau@hudsonvalleycs.org.

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month

Saturday, May 1st, 2021

Hepatitis C Team Reaches Out At Poughkeepsie PODS

Tuesday, March 23rd, 2021

Our Hepatitis C (HCV) Patient Navigation program has been doing outreach at the Poughkeepsie PODS. These are former Dutchess County Jail inmate units that were converted to Temporary Housing Units during Covid-19. The HCV team provides HCV education, testing and runs a weekly table highlighting all of our HVCS programs.

The HCV Patient Navigation team tables at the PODS temporary housing shelters in Poughkeepsie.

MHA (Mental Health Association) and Hudson River Housing joined together to figure out how to provide services for individuals experiencing homeless in Dutchess County while adhering to social distancing guidelines. The space accommodates up to 52 males and 48 females.

We are glad to be a part of this valuable community resource!

Aging In Prison: A RealHealth Article Includes Perspective From HVCS

Tuesday, July 28th, 2020

Jennifer Brathwaite, our Director of Education and Prevention, is quoted in this two-part article on aging in prison on RealHealth.com.

This a lengthy yet eye-opening article that is well worth the read. Jennifer’s contributing quotes appear in Part Two.

Here’s an excerpt:

Brathwaite finds that sometimes formerly incarcerated seniors may not be aware and educated about issues concerning HIV. “While I wouldn’t want to stereotype or put everyone in the same group, I think that with our older population, there is less knowledge or access to information that’s current about the advancements in this area and in what we know about HIV, hep C, STIs [sexually transmitted infections], infectious disease transmission and things like that,” she observes. “I think there’s still a lot of stigma, specifically around HIV, and a lack of knowledge about how the virus is transmitted.”

Part One

Part Two