Posts Tagged ‘vaccine’

HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

Thursday, May 18th, 2023

HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

May 18

National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) is the lead for this day.

NIAID’s HIV Vaccine Awareness Day web site contains many resources. Also visit http://www.bethegeneration.org Exit Disclaimer to learn more.

More Resources

HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

Wednesday, May 18th, 2022

HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

May 18

National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) is the lead for this day.

NIAID’s HIV Vaccine Awareness Day web site contains many resources. Also visit http://www.bethegeneration.org Exit Disclaimer to learn more.

More Resources

HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

Tuesday, May 18th, 2021

HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

May 18

National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) is the lead for this day.

NIAID’s HIV Vaccine Awareness Day web site contains many resources. Also visit http://www.bethegeneration.org Exit Disclaimer to learn more.

More Resources

COVID-19 Update: CDC Says Vaccinated People Can Unmask Outdoors

Wednesday, April 28th, 2021

As of April 27, 2021, CDC updated its Guiding Principles for Fully Vaccinated People, including the use of masks in outdoor settings. People are considered fully vaccinated if they are two or more weeks past their two-shot vaccine (Moderna or Pfizer) or their one-shot vaccine (Johnson & Johnson).

According to the CDC: “Fully vaccinated people no longer need to wear a mask outdoors, except in certain crowded settings and venues.”

Key points of the updated guidelines are:

Outdoor visits and activities pose minimal risk to fully vaccinated people themselves or to those around them.

Small, private gatherings and visits to public indoor spaces likely represent minimal risk to fully vaccinated people. Therefore, the level of precautions taken should be determined by the characteristics of the unvaccinated people present, who remain unprotected against COVID-19.

Although the risk of COVID-19 infection may be minimal to the fully vaccinated person themselves, vaccinated persons should be mindful of the very low potential risk of transmitting the virus to others if they become infected, especially if they are visiting with unvaccinated people at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 or visiting with unvaccinated people who have people at increased risk for severe disease in their own households.

In indoor public spaces, the vaccination status of other people or whether they are at increased risk for severe COVID-19 is likely unknown. Therefore, fully vaccinated people should continue to wear a well-fitted mask, cover coughs and sneezes, wash hands often, and following any applicable workplace or school guidance.

Fully vaccinated people should not visit or attend a gathering or visit public settings if they have tested positive for COVID-19 in the prior 10 days or are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, regardless of vaccination status of the other people at the gathering.

Fully vaccinated people should continue to follow any applicable state, local, tribal or territorial laws, rules, and regulations.

Although the risk of COVID-19 infection among fully vaccinated people is likely low, the following could increase risk:

  • A moderate, substantial, or high level of community transmission
  • Settings with a higher percentage of unvaccinated people (including children) present or people at risk of severe COVID-19 disease
  • Visits to indoor settings especially with poor ventilation
  • The length of the visit, especially if indoors
  • Crowding or when there is a decreased ability to maintain physical distance
  • Activities that involve behaviors such as singing, shouting, physical exertion or heavy breathing, inability to wear a mask, or inability to maintain physical distancing

We will provide more information as it becomes available. For specific questions regarding your health and vaccine safety, please contact your health care provider (and if you need one of those, talk to us, or give Cornerstone Family Healthcare a call). Plus, get more COVID-19 info here.

New Yorkers Age 16+ Now Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccines

Wednesday, April 7th, 2021

Who Can Get Vaccinated

April 6, 2021 –

All New Yorkers age 16 and up are now eligible for the vaccine.

Eligible groups include doctors, nurses and health care workers, people age 16 and over, first responders, teachers, public transit workers, grocery store workers, public safety workers and New Yorkers with certain comorbidities and underlying conditions.

Vaccine eligibility in New York State

Please visit the New York State website for additional information on eligibility.

For more coronavirus resources, visit this page.

The Latest COVID-19 Vaccine Eligibility

Wednesday, March 24th, 2021

March 23, 2021 – As of Tuesday, March 23rd, all people aged 50 and above are eligible for the COVID-19 vaccines.

Read more about the vaccines, eligibility and other COVID-19 news on Cornerstone’s website, or visit the New York State official website.

HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

Monday, May 18th, 2020

HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

May 18

National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) is the lead for this day.

NIAID’s HIV Vaccine Awareness Day web site contains many resources. Also visit http://www.bethegeneration.org Exit Disclaimer to learn more.

More Resources

HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

Thursday, May 18th, 2017

HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

May 18

National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) is the lead for this day.

NIAID’s HIV Vaccine Awareness Day web site contains many resources. Also visit http://www.bethegeneration.org Exit Disclaimer to learn more.

More Resources

CDC, NYS Recommend Meningococcal Vaccine for All HIV+ Individuals & Those At High-Risk

Friday, October 28th, 2016

October 28, 2016 – HEALTH ADVISORY: NYSDOH MENINGOCOCCAL VACCINE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS AND THOSE AT HIGH RISK OF HIV INFECTION

Summary:

The CDC and the New York State Department of Health says that people who are HIV+ or are high risk for becoming HIV+ are at increased risk for invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). They are recommending that adults who are HIV+, children older than 2 months who are HIV+, and those at high risk for new HIV infection (especially those who are good candidates for pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, which includes men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender people) should get a meningococcal vaccine.

The vaccine is covered by Medicaid, ADAP and private insurance.

Invasive meningococcal disease is a serious bacterial infection caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. The bacteria can invade the body causing serious illness, like meningitis. It can also cause septicemia—an infection of the bloodstream. Bacterial meningitis is very serious and can be deadly. Death can occur in as little as a few hours. While most people with meningitis recover, permanent disabilities such as brain damage, hearing loss, and learning disabilities can result from the infection.

Detailed Information:

In response to epidemiological data indicating increased risk for certain sub-types of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) among people living with HIV, updated recommendations regarding meningococcal vaccination have been issued by the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

Specific vaccine recommendations are available for young children living with HIV, persons living with HIV and also persons at high risk for HIV infection, including people taking/ eligible for PrEP, including transgender individuals and MSM.

Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted to recommend that persons aged ≥ 2 months with HIV infection should receive meningococcal conjugate (MenACWY) vaccine, either MenACWY-D (Menactra®), MenACWY-CRM (Menveo®) or, as age-appropriate, Hib-MenCY-TT (MenHibrix®, recommended for ages 2-18 months).1

This recommendation was made based on epidemiologic data demonstrating an increased risk of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) due to serogroups C, W and Y among HIV-infected persons in the United States.

HIV-infected persons have not been demonstrated to be at increased risk of serogroup B disease, and use of serogroup B (MenB) vaccine has not been studied in this group; for this reason MenB vaccine is not recommended for HIV-infected persons unless they have another indication for this vaccine.

HIV-infected individuals have suppressed immune responses to MenACWY vaccine, as well as waning of vaccine-induced immunity. For this reason, a multi-dose primary series and regular booster doses are necessary to maintain protection against IMD.

In response to the ACIP recommendations, the NYSDOH advises healthcare providers to administer MenACWY vaccine to:

  • All HIV-infected children and adults aged 2 months or older, and
  • HIV-negative individuals at ongoing high risk for HIV infection, to include
  • Men who have sex with men (MSM) who are candidates for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) as described in the NYSDOH AIDS Institute Guidance for the Use of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis to Prevent HIV Transmission”2 and Transgender individuals who are candidates for PrEP.

Vaccine costs and administration fees for HIV-positive individuals are reimbursable through the New York State Medicaid program and the AIDS Drug Assistance Program, as well as private insurance. MenACWY vaccine is covered under the Vaccines for Children (VFC) and Vaccines for Adults (VFA) programs for eligible children and adults.

MenACWY vaccine is also an allowable State Aid expense under Article 6 for LHDs unable to recoup the costs of vaccination through billing. Healthcare providers are reminded to report immediately both suspect and confirmed IMD cases to the LHD where the patient resides. Do not wait for laboratory confirmation to report. Contact information for LHDs can be found at http://www.health.ny.gov/contact/contact_information/index.htm.

Healthcare providers are reminded to immediately report both suspect and confirmed IMD cases to the local health department where the patient resides.  Clinicians with questions regarding vaccine recommendations should contact the NYSDOH Bureau of Immunization at immunize@health.ny.gov or 518-473-4437 or the AIDS Institute Office of the Medical Director at 212-417-4536.

Read the full announcement from the New York State Dept. of Health (PDF)

HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) is the lead for this day.

Read and share this 2015 NIAID Bulletin about HIV Vaccine Awareness Day.

NIAID’s HIV Vaccine Awareness Day web site contains many resources. Also visit http://www.bethegeneration.org Exit Disclaimer to learn more.