Posts Tagged ‘hepatitis’

World Hepatitis Day

Wednesday, July 28th, 2021

The World Hepatitis Day on 28 July  is an opportunity to add momentum to all efforts to implement the WHO’s first global health sector strategy on viral hepatitis for 2016-2021 and help Member States achieve the final goal – to eliminate hepatitis.

Eliminate hepatitis

Activities and awareness around World Hepatitis Day are designed to:

  • Build and leverage political engagement following official endorsement of the Global Health Sector Strategy on viral hepatitis at the World Health Assembly 2016.
  • Showcase emerging national responses to hepatitis in heavy burden countries.
  • Encourage actions and engagement by individuals, partners and the public.
  • Highlight the need for a greater global response .

In support of the “Eliminate hepatitis” campaign, WHO will release new information on national responses in 28 countries with the heaviest burden.

11 countries which carry almost 50% of the global burden of chronic hepatitis:

Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Uganda, Viet Nam.

17 countries that also have high prevalence and together with the above, account for 70% of the global burden:

Cambodia, Cameroon, Colombia, Ethiopia, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Morocco, Nepal, Peru, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Thailand, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Zimbabwe.

Key messages for World Hepatitis Day

1. Viral hepatitis is a major global health problem and needs an urgent response.

There were approximately 325 million people living with chronic hepatitis at the end of 2015.

Globally, an estimated 257 million people were living with hepatitis B (HBV) infection, and 71 million people were living with hepatitis C (HCV) infection in 2015.

2. Very few of those infected accessed testing and treatment, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

By the end of 2015, only 9% of HBV-infected people and 20% of HCV-infected people had been tested and diagnosed. Of those diagnosed with HBV infection, 8% (or 1.7 million people) were on treatment, while 7% of those diagnosed with HCV infection (or 1.1 million people) had started treatment in 2015.

The global targets for 2030 are: 90% of people with HBV and HCV infections tested and 80% of eligible patients are reached with treatment.

3. Viral hepatitis caused 1.34 million deaths in 2015 – comparable with TB deaths and exceeding deaths from HIV. Hepatitis deaths are increasing.

4. New hepatitis infections continue to occur, mostly hepatitis C.

The number of children under five living with chronic HBV infection was reduced to 1.3% in 2015 (from 4.7% before vaccines were introduced).

Hepatitis B vaccine is preventing approximately 4.5 million infections per year in children.

However, 1.75 million adults were newly infected with HCV in 2015, largely due to injecting drug use and due to unsafe injections in health care settings in certain countries.

5. Achieving the 2030 elimination goal is not overly ambitious; reports from 28 high-burden countries give cause for optimism.

On World Hepatitis Day 2017, WHO is publishing 28 country profiles which show that, despite many challenges, the global effort to eliminate hepatitis is gaining ground. However, major obstacles still remain.

Related links

World Hepatitis Day

Tuesday, July 28th, 2020

The World Hepatitis Day on 28 July  is an opportunity to add momentum to all efforts to implement the WHO’s first global health sector strategy on viral hepatitis for 2016-2021 and help Member States achieve the final goal – to eliminate hepatitis.

Eliminate hepatitis

Activities and awareness around World Hepatitis Day are designed to:

  • Build and leverage political engagement following official endorsement of the Global Health Sector Strategy on viral hepatitis at the World Health Assembly 2016.
  • Showcase emerging national responses to hepatitis in heavy burden countries.
  • Encourage actions and engagement by individuals, partners and the public.
  • Highlight the need for a greater global response .

In support of the “Eliminate hepatitis” campaign, WHO will release new information on national responses in 28 countries with the heaviest burden.

11 countries which carry almost 50% of the global burden of chronic hepatitis:

Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Uganda, Viet Nam.

17 countries that also have high prevalence and together with the above, account for 70% of the global burden:

Cambodia, Cameroon, Colombia, Ethiopia, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Morocco, Nepal, Peru, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Thailand, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Zimbabwe.

Key messages for World Hepatitis Day

1. Viral hepatitis is a major global health problem and needs an urgent response.

There were approximately 325 million people living with chronic hepatitis at the end of 2015.

Globally, an estimated 257 million people were living with hepatitis B (HBV) infection, and 71 million people were living with hepatitis C (HCV) infection in 2015.

2. Very few of those infected accessed testing and treatment, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

By the end of 2015, only 9% of HBV-infected people and 20% of HCV-infected people had been tested and diagnosed. Of those diagnosed with HBV infection, 8% (or 1.7 million people) were on treatment, while 7% of those diagnosed with HCV infection (or 1.1 million people) had started treatment in 2015.

The global targets for 2030 are: 90% of people with HBV and HCV infections tested and 80% of eligible patients are reached with treatment.

3. Viral hepatitis caused 1.34 million deaths in 2015 – comparable with TB deaths and exceeding deaths from HIV. Hepatitis deaths are increasing.

4. New hepatitis infections continue to occur, mostly hepatitis C.

The number of children under five living with chronic HBV infection was reduced to 1.3% in 2015 (from 4.7% before vaccines were introduced).

Hepatitis B vaccine is preventing approximately 4.5 million infections per year in children.

However, 1.75 million adults were newly infected with HCV in 2015, largely due to injecting drug use and due to unsafe injections in health care settings in certain countries.

5. Achieving the 2030 elimination goal is not overly ambitious; reports from 28 high-burden countries give cause for optimism.

On World Hepatitis Day 2017, WHO is publishing 28 country profiles which show that, despite many challenges, the global effort to eliminate hepatitis is gaining ground. However, major obstacles still remain.

Related links

Hepatitis A Outbreak in Dutchess County

Monday, February 10th, 2020

Beginning this summer, officials noticed an uptick in Hepatitis A cases and by fall identified this as an outbreak. Infections are highest among transient populations including people who use/inject drugs, individuals who are homeless or in shelter/temporary housing situations, as well as individuals who have recently been released from jail.

With guidance from the Dutchess County Department of Health, we strongly recommend Hepatitis A vaccinations for our clients that identify as the priority population. As a general advisory, we want to make everyone aware that handwashing is the number one recommendation to safeguard yourselves. Additionally, Hepatitis A vaccinations are available with primary care doctors. Being vaccinated is the best defense against Hep A!

For more information, please contact us at (914) 345-8888 or by email.

World Hepatitis Day

Sunday, July 28th, 2019

The World Hepatitis Day on 28 July  is an opportunity to add momentum to all efforts to implement the WHO’s first global health sector strategy on viral hepatitis for 2016-2021 and help Member States achieve the final goal – to eliminate hepatitis.

Eliminate hepatitis

Activities and awareness around World Hepatitis Day are designed to:

  • Build and leverage political engagement following official endorsement of the Global Health Sector Strategy on viral hepatitis at the World Health Assembly 2016.
  • Showcase emerging national responses to hepatitis in heavy burden countries.
  • Encourage actions and engagement by individuals, partners and the public.
  • Highlight the need for a greater global response .

In support of the “Eliminate hepatitis” campaign, WHO will release new information on national responses in 28 countries with the heaviest burden.

11 countries which carry almost 50% of the global burden of chronic hepatitis:

Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Uganda, Viet Nam.

17 countries that also have high prevalence and together with the above, account for 70% of the global burden:

Cambodia, Cameroon, Colombia, Ethiopia, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Morocco, Nepal, Peru, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Thailand, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Zimbabwe.

Key messages for World Hepatitis Day

1. Viral hepatitis is a major global health problem and needs an urgent response.

There were approximately 325 million people living with chronic hepatitis at the end of 2015.

Globally, an estimated 257 million people were living with hepatitis B (HBV) infection, and 71 million people were living with hepatitis C (HCV) infection in 2015.

2. Very few of those infected accessed testing and treatment, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

By the end of 2015, only 9% of HBV-infected people and 20% of HCV-infected people had been tested and diagnosed. Of those diagnosed with HBV infection, 8% (or 1.7 million people) were on treatment, while 7% of those diagnosed with HCV infection (or 1.1 million people) had started treatment in 2015.

The global targets for 2030 are: 90% of people with HBV and HCV infections tested and 80% of eligible patients are reached with treatment.

3. Viral hepatitis caused 1.34 million deaths in 2015 – comparable with TB deaths and exceeding deaths from HIV. Hepatitis deaths are increasing.

4. New hepatitis infections continue to occur, mostly hepatitis C.

The number of children under five living with chronic HBV infection was reduced to 1.3% in 2015 (from 4.7% before vaccines were introduced).

Hepatitis B vaccine is preventing approximately 4.5 million infections per year in children.

However, 1.75 million adults were newly infected with HCV in 2015, largely due to injecting drug use and due to unsafe injections in health care settings in certain countries.

5. Achieving the 2030 elimination goal is not overly ambitious; reports from 28 high-burden countries give cause for optimism.

On World Hepatitis Day 2017, WHO is publishing 28 country profiles which show that, despite many challenges, the global effort to eliminate hepatitis is gaining ground. However, major obstacles still remain.

Related links

World Hepatitis Day

Friday, July 28th, 2017

The World Hepatitis Day on 28 July  is an opportunity to add momentum to all efforts to implement the WHO’s first global health sector strategy on viral hepatitis for 2016-2021 and help Member States achieve the final goal – to eliminate hepatitis.

Eliminate hepatitis

Activities and awareness around World Hepatitis Day are designed to:

  • Build and leverage political engagement following official endorsement of the Global Health Sector Strategy on viral hepatitis at the World Health Assembly 2016.
  • Showcase emerging national responses to hepatitis in heavy burden countries.
  • Encourage actions and engagement by individuals, partners and the public.
  • Highlight the need for a greater global response .

In support of the “Eliminate hepatitis” campaign, WHO will release new information on national responses in 28 countries with the heaviest burden.

11 countries which carry almost 50% of the global burden of chronic hepatitis:

Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Uganda, Viet Nam.

17 countries that also have high prevalence and together with the above, account for 70% of the global burden:

Cambodia, Cameroon, Colombia, Ethiopia, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Morocco, Nepal, Peru, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Thailand, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Zimbabwe.

Key messages for World Hepatitis Day

1. Viral hepatitis is a major global health problem and needs an urgent response.

There were approximately 325 million people living with chronic hepatitis at the end of 2015.

Globally, an estimated 257 million people were living with hepatitis B (HBV) infection, and 71 million people were living with hepatitis C (HCV) infection in 2015.

2. Very few of those infected accessed testing and treatment, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

By the end of 2015, only 9% of HBV-infected people and 20% of HCV-infected people had been tested and diagnosed. Of those diagnosed with HBV infection, 8% (or 1.7 million people) were on treatment, while 7% of those diagnosed with HCV infection (or 1.1 million people) had started treatment in 2015.

The global targets for 2030 are: 90% of people with HBV and HCV infections tested and 80% of eligible patients are reached with treatment.

3. Viral hepatitis caused 1.34 million deaths in 2015 – comparable with TB deaths and exceeding deaths from HIV. Hepatitis deaths are increasing.

4. New hepatitis infections continue to occur, mostly hepatitis C.

The number of children under five living with chronic HBV infection was reduced to 1.3% in 2015 (from 4.7% before vaccines were introduced).

Hepatitis B vaccine is preventing approximately 4.5 million infections per year in children.

However, 1.75 million adults were newly infected with HCV in 2015, largely due to injecting drug use and due to unsafe injections in health care settings in certain countries.

5. Achieving the 2030 elimination goal is not overly ambitious; reports from 28 high-burden countries give cause for optimism.

On World Hepatitis Day 2017, WHO is publishing 28 country profiles which show that, despite many challenges, the global effort to eliminate hepatitis is gaining ground. However, major obstacles still remain.

Related links

World Hepatitis Day

Thursday, July 28th, 2016

July 28th is World Hepatitis Day, a day to raise awareness about the prevalence of hepatitis and its impact on health, healthcare and patient’s lives.

From HepMag.com:

As with so many diseases, we’ve come a long way in understanding hepatitis, notably two chronic and serious forms: hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Several drugs are now on the market to manage hepatitis B, and a growing number of agents are becoming available to potentially cure hepatitis C. At the same time, we’re continually learning how to use approved medications much more easily and effectively.

But first, some basics.

The liver is the largest organ inside the human body. About the size of a football, it is located in the upper right part of the abdomen.

We can’t live without a functioning liver. It’s the body’s filter and warehouse. Almost all cells and tissues in the body depend on the liver. When something goes wrong with the liver, it can have a serious effect on almost every other organ in the body.

A little more than 1.5 quarts of blood pump through the liver every minute, allowing the liver to quickly and effectively remove toxins and waste products from the bloodstream. At the same time, the liver stores important nutrients such as vitamins, minerals and iron. The liver also plays a role in managing levels of certain substances in the body, such as cholesterol, hormones and sugars, which are all necessary for survival and are potentially harmful when out of balance. The liver also has a key role in digesting food because if produces bile. In addition, the liver controls blood-clotting factors, which prevent excessive bleeding.

Hepatitis is a general term that means inflammation of the liver. The Ancient Greek word hepa refers to the liver, and itis means inflammation (as in arthritis, dermatitis and pancreatitis).

Inflammation of the liver—hepatitis—has several possible causes, including:

  • Toxins and chemicals such as excessive amounts of alcohol
  • Autoimmune diseases that cause the immune system to attack healthy tissues in the body
  • Fat which may cause fatty liver disease
  • Microorganisms, including viruses

Hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect liver cells—called hepatocytes—that provide the best conditions for these viruses to reproduce. In response to the infection, the body’s immune system targets the liver, causing inflammation (hepatitis). If the hepatitis is severe (which can happen with HAV and HBV) or goes on for a long period of time (which can happen with HBV and HCV), hardened fibers can develop in the liver, a condition called fibrosis.

Over time, more and more normal liver tissue can be replaced by hardened scar tissue, which can obstruct the normal flow of blood through the liver and seriously affect its structure and ability to function properly. This is called cirrhosis. If the liver is severely damaged, blood can back up into the spleen and the intestines, which can result in high pressure in these organs. Consequences of this condition—called portal hypertension—include bleeding (variceal bleeding) and fluid in the abdomen (ascites). Significant liver damage can also reduce the production of bile needed for proper digestion, and it can decrease the liver’s ability to store and process nutrients needed for survival. Other effects of a damaged liver include the inability to remove toxins from the bloodstream, which can eventually lead to mental confusion and even coma (hepatic encephalopathy).

There are five viruses known to affect the liver and cause hepatitis: HAV, HBV, HCV, the delta hepatitis virus (HDV, which only causes problems for people infected with HBV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV).

CDC Launches New Online Self-Survey for Viral Hepatitis Risk

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

Viral hepatitis is the leading cause of liver cancer and the most common reason for liver transplantation. An estimated 4.4 million Americans are living with chronic hepatitis; most do not know they are infected.

To raise awareness for the virus and to increase the number of people who know if they are infected (and, of course, get treatment), the CDC has launched a new online survey to identify potential risks for viral hepatitis infection. Take the survey online today at:

http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/riskassessment/?s_cid=ostltsdyk_govd_232

To learn more about hepatitis, your risk, how to stay safe, and to get treatment if you are Hep+, please contact us.

Hepatitis C: Screening, Diagnosis, and Linkage to Care

Monday, March 17th, 2014

Description: This one day training will help increase non-clinical health and human services provider’s knowledge of Hepatitis C screening and diagnosis and the importance of effective linkage to care for persons infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV).

By the completion of this training, providers will be able to:

  • Describe the burden of HCV disease.
  • Identify HCV risk groups.
  • Describe the NYS law with regard to offering an HCV screening test.
  • Distinguish between HCV screening and diagnostic tests and the meaning of their results.
  • Demonstrate the delivery of accurate HCV counseling messages based on test result.
  • State and explain the importance of linking people infected with HCV to care.
  • List two barriers and two solutions to effectively linking HCV infected persons to care.
  • State at least two core components of an effective active HCV linkage to care model.

Prerequisite:  It is strongly recommended that participants have basic knowledge of HCV or have previously attended, ‘Integrating Viral Hepatitis into Your Work,’ or, ‘HIV and HCV Co-infection,’ trainings.

Audience: All non-clinical health and human services provider

Introduction to HIV, STIs and Viral Hepatitis

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

This one day introductory training will prepare non-physician health and human services providers to address HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and viral hepatitis in an integrated, client-centered manner. The training will review the similarities and differences in transmission, screening, available treatments and needed support services for each of the diseases. The training will emphasize the connection between these diseases and the skills needed to effectively interact with clients whose sexual or substance using behaviors place them at risk for HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis.

As a result of this training, participants will be able to:

• Recall data showing the overlap of cases of HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis;

• State the rationale and importance of integration of services related to HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis;

• State the similarities and differences in how HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis are transmitted;

• Deliver an integrated prevention message for HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis;

• Provide clients with basic information about the spectrum of illness, testing and treatment for HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis; and

• Link clients to needed HIV, STI, and viral hepatitis testing, treatment and support services.

Prerequisite: There is no prerequisite for this training. It is intended for individuals who have not had prior training in HIV, STIs or viral hepatitis.

Audience: This introductory training is for non-physician health and human services providers who will be responsible for delivering prevention, care or support services related to HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis.

To register, visit www.hivtrainingny.org.

Introduction to HIV, STIs and Viral Hepatitis

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

This one day introductory training will prepare non-physician health and human services providers to address HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and viral hepatitis in an integrated, client-centered manner. The training will review the similarities and differences in transmission, screening, available treatments and needed support services for each of the diseases. The training will emphasize the connection between these diseases and the skills needed to effectively interact with clients whose sexual or substance using behaviors place them at risk for HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis.

As a result of this training, participants will be able to:

• Recall data showing the overlap of cases of HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis;

• State the rationale and importance of integration of services related to HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis;

• State the similarities and differences in how HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis are transmitted;

• Deliver an integrated prevention message for HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis;

• Provide clients with basic information about the spectrum of illness, testing and treatment for HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis; and

• Link clients to needed HIV, STI, and viral hepatitis testing, treatment and support services.

Prerequisite: There is no prerequisite for this training. It is intended for individuals who have not had prior training in HIV, STIs or viral hepatitis.

Audience: This introductory training is for non-physician health and human services providers who will be responsible for delivering prevention, care or support services related to HIV, STIs and viral hepatitis.

To register, visit www.hivtrainingny.org.